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April 6, 2017

UGA's Most Notable "Intersectionals"

Before at Notre Dame, Georgia's "intersectionals" included one which attracted nearly 100,000 (left), a battle in Ann Arbor in which the only battle won by the hosts was the one for this Confederate flag (center), and a recent one in the desert where nearly 30 percent of the crowd wore red and black.
As you know, there’s been a lot of talk and buildup regarding Georgia’s trip to South Bend on September 9 to face the Fighting Irish of Notre Dame. Recently, a sports-talk radio host even went as far as saying the contest “as far as an intersectional opponent, is probably the most intriguing road trip ever for the Bulldogs.” Well, for those of you not from the “old school,” yes, Notre Dame is just that—“an intersectional opponent,” or essentially a foe from outside the Southeast. However, the “probably the most intriguing road trip ever for the Bulldogs” part is probably not accurate, at least in my opinion. Accordingly, here is my opinion of Georgia’s top 5 (plus a couple of honorable mentions) all-time most intriguing, anticipated—let’s say—notable intersectional road games entering this season: 

5) September 20, 2008 at Arizona State: Marking Georgia’s first intersectional game since 1967 (at Houston), its first outside the South since 1965 (at Michigan), and its first visit out West since 1960 (at Southern California), Bulldog enthusiasts came in droves to Tempe, Arizona. Georgia not only sold its allotted 7,000 seats, but Bulldog fans even bought Arizona State home tickets to ensure themselves a spot. By kickoff, it was estimated that at least 16,000-17,000 spectators, and maybe as many as 20,000, in the 71,706-seat stadium were dressed in red and black. And, they witnessed a good showing from the visitors. Knowshon Moreno rushed for 149 yards, A.J. Green totaled 159 yards receiving, and together they were responsible for all three of third-ranked Georgia’s touchdowns in a 27-10 win. READ THE REST OF THE RANKINGS...

February 13, 2017

Steady Slipping in the Cup Standings

From Dooley (left) to Damon (right) to McGarity (center), in the quest for the “cups” of college sports (both of them), UGA athletics have steadily slipped with each succeeding athletic director.
I was intrigued with the recent post on The Dawgvent started by @drdon50 regarding Georgia’s current ranking for the annual NACDA Directors’ Cup, whereby points are awarded to athletic programs based on their finish in polls/championship events. Stanford has won the cup for the last 20-something years in a row, which brings up a good point by @LawDawg86: Twenty sports are considered (10 men, 10 women) for the cup standings, yet Georgia participates in 18, meaning the school receives two “zeros.” The highly-ranked schools, like Stanford, compete in more than 20 sports, often excelling in country club athletics, Olympic sports, and the more obscure.

“Not defending the AD, just pointing out all the facts,” LawDawg86 concluded. In agreement—not defending or attacking Greg McGarity—I wanted to discover the facts regarding the NACDA Directors’ Cup standings and how Georgia performed during the tenures of its last three athletic directors.

The standings began being released annually with the 1993-94 academic year and have continued over the last 23 years: 11 years under AD Vince Dooley (1993-94 through 2003-04), six years under AD Damon Evans (2004-05 through 2009-10), and six years under AD McGarity (2010-11 through 2015-16). As mentioned, since schools compete in a varying number of sports, I decided to consider only the Southeastern Conference, and just the 12 schools which have been members for the duration of the time being measured (1993-94 to present), because schools in the SEC more or less/nearly compete in the same sports.

For the final 11 years Vince Dooley was athletic director, Georgia’s average national ranking in the Directors’ Cup was No. 11½, while the Bulldogs had a 2.6 average finish of the 12 SEC teams at the time. Their average point total was good for a solid second-place finish in the conference, trailing top-ranked Florida by an average of 117.7 points... TO READ REST AND VIEW TABLES.

January 12, 2017

Do Rivals’ Rankings Really Matter?

Having compiled something similar about a year ago—Rivals’ annual team recruiting rankings correlating to the annual final AP Poll—I wanted to calculate and post an update since the recent release of the final AP Poll for 2016.

Beginning with Rivals’ initial team rankings in 2002 and over a 15-year period through last year, I awarded points as it’s conducted for the AP Poll, allocating one point for a 25th team ranking, two points for a 24th ranking, etc. The result was Rivals’ 15-year team recruiting rankings (2002-2016): CONTINUE w/ ARTICLE...

December 14, 2016

UGA “Record Watches” Despite Season of Setbacks

During the upcoming Liberty Bowl, pay attention to the performances by ISAIAH McKENZIE, JACOB EASON, DOMINICK SANDERS, and even GREYSON LAMBERT as those Bulldogs, plus several others, will be on "record watch."
Despite what seems like a slew of disappointments suffered this season by the Georgia football team, perhaps some solace is that the Bulldogs are going bowling for the 20th consecutive campaign, which is the third-longest active postseason streak, and the seventh-longest in the history of college football. What’s more—and I give credit to my friend, Aaron, for drawing this to my attention—Georgia has played in 51 consecutive bowl games where it has scored. In other words, the Bulldogs have never been held scoreless in post-season play, which is the sport’s all-time longest bowl streak,whereby Georgia hopes to extend to 52 games come December 30.

Speaking of the Liberty Bowl, with the contest versus the Horned Frogs looming, I discovered a season or career school record/feat which could be in jeopardy of being surpassed/matched for each of the main school-record categories. For what they’re worth, especially considering a few of these are rather obscure to say the least, Georgia’s top individual “record watches” for the Liberty Bowl against TCU:


November 24, 2016

Opinion: They Would Want Them to Count**

Glimpses of the 1943 and 1944 Georgia-Georgia Tech games...
They look like "true"teams/games to me.
Happy Thanksgiving! If you've been following this blog for some time, you may recall my annual posting during Thanksgiving/Tech week on why I believe—and, this is rather difficult for me to admit—UGA should erase the two asterisks, so to speak, and recognized its losses to the Jackets in 1943 and 1944 in the rivalry's series record.

For my new and updated opinion piece on this matter, please check it out here at UGASports.com... 

November 9, 2016

Defying the Odds as Double-Digit Dawgs

This Saturday, Georgia will attempt to repeat what it achieved versus Auburn in (L to R) 1986--which brought out the Jordan-Hare hoses; 1970, when the Dogs brought down Auburn QB Pat Sullivan; a decade ago in 2006, and on two other occasions: defeat the Tigers when double-digit underdogs.
Checkout every Tuesday at UGASports.com during this football season whereby I post "Point Spread Tuesday." This week's...

October 28, 2016

UGA-UF not the FIRST “World’s Largest Outdoor Cocktail Party”?

From long ago, spectators at The Carolina Cup or, perhaps,
the first World's Largest Outdoor Cocktail Party?
 
This we know: In the late 1950s, the annual event that is Georgia-Florida first came to be known by its distinguished title—the “World’s Largest Outdoor Cocktail Party”—from Bill Kastelz, the editor of The Florida Times-Union. Kastelz supposedly created the moniker, but would use it just once in a column. Regardless, the nickname was said to have been picked up by other writers, yet I cannot find routine use of it by the media until the late 1960s (although perhaps there was widespread use by fans and the like).

Set in Camden, South Carolina, The Carolina Cup (also once referred to as “The Camden Cup”) is a huge steeplechase horse race occurring in the spring. Beginning in the 1930s, the racing spectacle has been as much as a social function as it is a sporting event and, at one time, was billed by the press as “The World’s Largest Outdoor Cocktail Party.” From what I discovered, the moniker was used routinely by the media for The Carolina Cup beginning in the mid-1960s, or just before the press started commonly using the label for Georgia-Florida. It was also during the mid-1960s that the event was recognized as having been “The World’s Largest Outdoor Cocktail Party” for “many years.” During the 1970s, or when the use of “The World’s Largest Outdoor Cocktail Party” had become widespread in Jacksonville, the use of the title for the event in Camden dwindled as the state of South Carolina increased activity in enforcing liquor laws.

October 10, 2016

No Pass, No Problem

Whether (L to R) against Cincinnati in 1976 (or a few other games that season), Notre Dame in the 1981 Sugar Bowl, Tennessee in 1988, or South Carolina yesterday, among many others, Georgia has a history of routinely winning when hardly passing.
Checkout every Monday at UGASports.com during this football season whereby I post "Pat's Weekly Stat (you likely won't see anywhere else)." This week's...

September 23, 2016

Swatted wasps, spilled Coke, & Herschel hurdling

Checkout every week at UGASports.com during this football season whereby I long to hear the voice of the late, legendary Larry Munson. I recently was fortunate enough to have gained access to many Munson radio-called games spanning a couple of decades or so. Therefore, I am posting highlights I compiled from a Munson broadcast of a Georgia game from yesteryear. Adding only photos taken from the particular game, and some commentary, each video will be associated with the Bulldogs' upcoming opponent, or the date for which it is posted.

Entering Georgia's game at Ole Miss in 1981, the once-beaten Bulldogs were favored by only just over a touchdown in a road affair which was supposed to be rather contested. Instead, during a dreary day 35 years ago--so dreary that planes could not fly into Oxford--Georgia and Ole Miss featured the killing of wasps and spilled Coke in the broadcast booth and, on the gridiron, one of his best collegiate performances by the legendary Herschel Walker (and, the greatest 6-yard run in the history of the sport), resulting in a 30-point blowout by the Bulldogs over their host:

September 2, 2016

One is the Loneliest Number...


"One" is for (L to R) DAVE O'BRIEN, Larry Munson's lone replacement for a 41-season stretch; KNOWSHON MORENO's 1-yard celebratory TD vs. Florida in 2007; and, the one time brothers faced off against one another in a bowl game--a historical moment which nearly didn't occur.

Only one day remains until Georgia kicks off the season against North Carolina. Stats guru Dave McMahon and I demonstrate six ways why "1" is relative and unique to UGA football. Check us out everyday at UGASports.com...